What the issue is

Buttons with insufficient size and spacing can significantly impede usability for many users. Small buttons or buttons placed too closely together can be difficult to target, especially for users with motor impairments who may have difficulty accurately clicking or tapping the desired button. Touchscreen users and those using alternative pointing devices, such as a stylus, also face challenges when interacting with small or closely spaced buttons.

What the issue is

Incorrect application of ARIA (Accessible Rich Internet Applications) roles to buttons can lead to significant accessibility challenges. For example, a <div> or <span> element being used as a button without an appropriate role="button" attribute fails to convey its function to assistive technology users. Similarly, misuse of ARIA attributes, such as using "aria-pressed" on buttons that do not toggle state, can provide misleading information.

What the issue is

Buttons across a web page that lack consistent activation methods pose a significant barrier to users, especially those relying on assistive technologies or different input methods (e.g., keyboard vs. mouse). If some buttons only activate on a mouse click without a corresponding keyboard event, such as pressing the "Enter" or "Space" key, this can prevent keyboard users from interacting with those elements entirely.  

What the issue is

Links that do not have sufficient color contrast compared to the surrounding text or background color can create readability issues. This includes both textual links and image links.  Users with visual impairments, such as color blindness or low vision, may struggle to identify or read these links, which can significantly impede their web navigation experience. Links without adequate contrast fail to stand out, requiring users to exert more effort to find navigable elements, potentially leading to a frustrating experience.

What the issue is

Links that are not accessible to screen reader users due to lack of proper ARIA labels or descriptive text result in those users being unable to understand the purpose of the link. This includes links that are entirely graphical with no textual annotation or rely solely on visual cues not conveyed to screen reader users. These practices can make navigation and understanding of web content challenging and frustrating for users who depend on assistive technologies.

What the issue is

Links that do not notify the user of a change in context, such as opening a new window or tab, or causing a document to unexpectedly download, navigating away from the current page, or triggering a significant change on the current page without prior warning. may disorient users when the context changes unexpectedly, not knowing if the action took them to a new page, opened a new window, or made changes without their knowledge.

What the issue is

Links that lack a visible focus indicator can significantly impede keyboard navigation, making it difficult for users who rely on a keyboard instead of a mouse to determine which link is currently selected. The absence of these indicators can lead to users losing track of their location on a web page, which not only hinders usability but also accessibility, particularly for those with visual impairments or motor disabilities that necessitate keyboard navigation.

What the issue is

Links with unclear or non-descriptive text, such as "click here," "more," or simply "link", provide little to no information on the destination of the link or the action it will perform. This practice fails to convey the purpose or relevance of the link, making navigation difficult, especially for those using assistive technologies like screen readers.

What the issue is

While having a descriptive page title is crucial for accessibility, an excessively long or overly complicated title can also pose problems. Titles that are burdened with too many keywords, contain complex jargon, or try to describe too much can be difficult to understand and process, especially for users with cognitive disabilities or those who rely on screen readers. Such titles may be cut off by browsers or screen readers, potentially omitting important information.