What the issue is

Web content that uses idiomatic expressions, slang, or jargon without providing explanations can be confusing or inaccessible to users not familiar with that expression. This includes users learning the language or those using assistive technologies, such as translation tools or screen readers, which may not accurately convey the meaning of such expressions.

What the issue is

Language selectors that do not visually or programmatically (through ARIA roles) indicate the currently selected language can confuse or disorient users. This oversight makes it difficult for users, especially those using assistive technologies, to understand which language is currently active or has been selected without encountering the content.

What the issue is

Forms and interactive widgets that do not support input in the user's preferred or native language create barriers. This issue arises in scenarios such as search boxes that only accept input in a certain language, form validation that incorrectly flags inputs in other languages as errors, or interfaces that do not accommodate right-to-left language inputs adequately.

What the issue is

There is a significant cognitive load as a blind screen reader user on arriving on a web page with content that is not in your language. A sighted user who is able to perceive the visual layout can quickly understand the situation and navigate to a language selector, should there be one. In comparison, a blind screen-reader user must navigate around a web page in a language they may not know, nor have expected, trying to find that language switcher.

What the issue is

When websites offer content in multiple languages, the mechanism to select a preferred language may not be clearly indicated or accessible through keyboard navigation and screen readers. This can include language selection options without proper semantic markup or aria-labels, as well as visual indicators that do not meet color contrast requirements or are not visible to screen reader users.

What the issue is

When the lang attribute on the <html> tag or within the document contains incorrect, outdated, or non-standard language codes, it can lead to misinterpretation of the content's language by browsers and assistive technologies. This issue arises when developers use incorrect ISO language codes, making the content inaccessible or difficult to understand for users relying on technology that adapts the content based on language settings.

What the issue is

Multilingual audio content embedded in web pages, like podcasts or videos, without indicating the language of the audio through proper markup, can cause confusion for users who use assistive technologies. Users might not receive content in their preferred language or could struggle with unexpected language changes without prior notification.

What the issue is

Text within the same content block or interface element, such as paragraphs or form labels and descriptions, switches between languages without proper language attribute adjustments. This can include using phrases or terms from another language within a predominantly single-language text without marking these phrases with the correct lang attribute.