What the issue is

Automatic language detection inaccurately assesses the user's preferred language, leading to a webpage being displayed in a language the user cannot understand. This often occurs with websites trying to automatically set the language based on the user's location (via IP address) or browser settings, without allowing an easy way for the user to change the language back to their preferred choice.

What the issue is

When including subdocuments within a webpage through elements like <iframe>, the omission of a lang attribute in the subdocuments can result in incorrect language identification and processing by assistive technologies. This misidentification can disrupt the user's ability to comprehend the content, especially if the language in the subdocument is different from the parent document.

What the issue is

Language selectors can fail colour contrast requirements when the text or graphical objects do not provide enough contrast against their background. This makes it difficult for users with visual impairments, including those with color vision deficiencies, to discern the options or current selection within the language selector widget.

What the issue is

Content in languages that are read right-to-left (RTL), such as Arabic and Hebrew, or those that may use vertical text directions, requires HTML elements to correctly manage text directionality. This includes using the dir attribute appropriately on elements or through CSS to ensure text is correctly aligned and read in its intended direction. Failure to do so can result in text that is difficult to read, comprehend, or interact with effectively.

What the issue is

When a language selector on a web page lists language options, but the names of the languages are not provided in their original language (for example, listing "German" instead of "Deutsch"), it can be confusing for users who are native speakers of those languages. This practice assumes that users have knowledge of the English names for their languages, which may not always be the case.

What the issue is

When audio or video content on a webpage includes a text transcript or captions that are not in the same language as the actual spoken content, it can create a barrier for users who are deaf, hard of hearing, or whose first language is different from the one presented. This includes instances where transcripts are provided in a default site language without considering the language used in multimedia content.