Issues by category

What the issue is

Text within the same content block or interface element, such as paragraphs or form labels and descriptions, switches between languages without proper language attribute adjustments. This can include using phrases or terms from another language within a predominantly single-language text without marking these phrases with the correct lang attribute.

What the issue is

While the lang attribute is used in HTML to indicate the language of the page or parts thereof, XML-based documents, such as SVG or XHTML, should use the xml:lang attribute for this purpose. When xml:lang is missing, incorrect, or inconsistent with the HTML lang attribute in XHTML documents, it can lead to confusion for assistive technologies, affecting the document's accessibility.

What the issue is

When the lang attribute on the <html> tag or within the document contains incorrect, outdated, or non-standard language codes, it can lead to misinterpretation of the content's language by browsers and assistive technologies. This issue arises when developers use incorrect ISO language codes, making the content inaccessible or difficult to understand for users relying on technology that adapts the content based on language settings.

What the issue is

Words that have multiple pronunciations based on their meaning or context can be difficult to understand for users relying on text-to-speech (TTS) technologies. Without clear pronunciation instructions using the ARIA attributes or similar techniques, TTS technologies might mispronounce words, leading to confusion or misunderstanding of the content.

What the issue is

Audio and video content on web pages without corresponding sign language translations pose a significant barrier to accessibility for users who are deaf or hard of hearing and rely on sign language. This includes not providing an equivalent sign language video that communicates the same information as the audio or spoken content.

What the issue is

There is a significant cognitive load as a blind screen reader user on arriving on a web page with content that is not in your language. A sighted user who is able to perceive the visual layout can quickly understand the situation and navigate to a language selector, should there be one. In comparison, a blind screen-reader user must navigate around a web page in a language they may not know, nor have expected, trying to find that language switcher.

What the issue is

Scripted or AJAX-loaded content often fails to include appropriate lang attributes when inserting text or other content into the document dynamically, particularly content in a different language than the main page or application. This failure can impact user understanding due to incorrect language processing by assistive technologies.

What the issue is

When audio or video content on a webpage includes a text transcript or captions that are not in the same language as the actual spoken content, it can create a barrier for users who are deaf, hard of hearing, or whose first language is different from the one presented. This includes instances where transcripts are provided in a default site language without considering the language used in multimedia content.

What the issue is

Web content that uses idiomatic expressions, slang, or jargon without providing explanations can be confusing or inaccessible to users not familiar with that expression. This includes users learning the language or those using assistive technologies, such as translation tools or screen readers, which may not accurately convey the meaning of such expressions.

What the issue is

Links that are not accessible to screen reader users due to lack of proper ARIA labels or descriptive text result in those users being unable to understand the purpose of the link. This includes links that are entirely graphical with no textual annotation or rely solely on visual cues not conveyed to screen reader users. These practices can make navigation and understanding of web content challenging and frustrating for users who depend on assistive technologies.

What the issue is

Links that do not notify the user of a change in context, such as opening a new window or tab, or causing a document to unexpectedly download, navigating away from the current page, or triggering a significant change on the current page without prior warning. may disorient users when the context changes unexpectedly, not knowing if the action took them to a new page, opened a new window, or made changes without their knowledge.

What the issue is

Links with unclear or non-descriptive text, such as "click here," "more," or simply "link", provide little to no information on the destination of the link or the action it will perform. This practice fails to convey the purpose or relevance of the link, making navigation difficult, especially for those using assistive technologies like screen readers.

What the issue is

Links that lack a visible focus indicator can significantly impede keyboard navigation, making it difficult for users who rely on a keyboard instead of a mouse to determine which link is currently selected. The absence of these indicators can lead to users losing track of their location on a web page, which not only hinders usability but also accessibility, particularly for those with visual impairments or motor disabilities that necessitate keyboard navigation.

What the issue is

Multilingual audio content embedded in web pages, like podcasts or videos, without indicating the language of the audio through proper markup, can cause confusion for users who use assistive technologies. Users might not receive content in their preferred language or could struggle with unexpected language changes without prior notification.

What the issue is

When websites offer content in multiple languages, the mechanism to select a preferred language may not be clearly indicated or accessible through keyboard navigation and screen readers. This can include language selection options without proper semantic markup or aria-labels, as well as visual indicators that do not meet color contrast requirements or are not visible to screen reader users.

What the issue is

When a language selector on a web page lists language options, but the names of the languages are not provided in their original language (for example, listing "German" instead of "Deutsch"), it can be confusing for users who are native speakers of those languages. This practice assumes that users have knowledge of the English names for their languages, which may not always be the case.