Voice navigation

What the issue is

When the visible label text of a button does not match its accessible name (the name exposed to assistive technologies), it can lead to confusion and inconsistency for users relying on screen readers or other assistive technologies. An example of this issue is when a button labeled "Submit Form" on the screen has an accessible name of "Go" due to a mismatch in the `aria-label` attribute.

What the issue is

Buttons that are inadequately labeled or utilize generic text such as "click here" or "submit" without providing context of the action being performed can significantly reduce accessibility. Users, especially those relying on screen readers, may not understand the purpose of the button or the action it initiates. This lack of clarity can lead to confusion and impede the ability to navigate and use a website effectively.

What the issue is

Links that are not accessible to screen reader users due to lack of proper ARIA labels or descriptive text result in those users being unable to understand the purpose of the link. This includes links that are entirely graphical with no textual annotation or rely solely on visual cues not conveyed to screen reader users. These practices can make navigation and understanding of web content challenging and frustrating for users who depend on assistive technologies.

What the issue is

When websites offer content in multiple languages, the mechanism to select a preferred language may not be clearly indicated or accessible through keyboard navigation and screen readers. This can include language selection options without proper semantic markup or aria-labels, as well as visual indicators that do not meet color contrast requirements or are not visible to screen reader users.

What the issue is

When the lang attribute on the <html> tag or within the document contains incorrect, outdated, or non-standard language codes, it can lead to misinterpretation of the content's language by browsers and assistive technologies. This issue arises when developers use incorrect ISO language codes, making the content inaccessible or difficult to understand for users relying on technology that adapts the content based on language settings.