Links

What the issue is

Links that do not have sufficient color contrast compared to the surrounding text or background color can create readability issues. This includes both textual links and image links.  Users with visual impairments, such as color blindness or low vision, may struggle to identify or read these links, which can significantly impede their web navigation experience. Links without adequate contrast fail to stand out, requiring users to exert more effort to find navigable elements, potentially leading to a frustrating experience.

What the issue is

Links that are not accessible to screen reader users due to lack of proper ARIA labels or descriptive text result in those users being unable to understand the purpose of the link. This includes links that are entirely graphical with no textual annotation or rely solely on visual cues not conveyed to screen reader users. These practices can make navigation and understanding of web content challenging and frustrating for users who depend on assistive technologies.

What the issue is

Links that do not notify the user of a change in context, such as opening a new window or tab, or causing a document to unexpectedly download, navigating away from the current page, or triggering a significant change on the current page without prior warning. may disorient users when the context changes unexpectedly, not knowing if the action took them to a new page, opened a new window, or made changes without their knowledge.

What the issue is

Links that lack a visible focus indicator can significantly impede keyboard navigation, making it difficult for users who rely on a keyboard instead of a mouse to determine which link is currently selected. The absence of these indicators can lead to users losing track of their location on a web page, which not only hinders usability but also accessibility, particularly for those with visual impairments or motor disabilities that necessitate keyboard navigation.

What the issue is

Links with unclear or non-descriptive text, such as "click here," "more," or simply "link", provide little to no information on the destination of the link or the action it will perform. This practice fails to convey the purpose or relevance of the link, making navigation difficult, especially for those using assistive technologies like screen readers.

What the issue is

There is a significant cognitive load as a blind screen reader user on arriving on a web page with content that is not in your language. A sighted user who is able to perceive the visual layout can quickly understand the situation and navigate to a language selector, should there be one. In comparison, a blind screen-reader user must navigate around a web page in a language they may not know, nor have expected, trying to find that language switcher.