Success Criterion 3.1.5 Reading Level

When text requires reading ability more advanced than the lower secondary education level after removal of proper names and titles, supplemental content, or a version that does not require reading ability more advanced than the lower secondary education level, is available.

WCAG Level
AAA
WCAG Versions
2.0
2.1
2.2

What the issue is

While having a descriptive page title is crucial for accessibility, an excessively long or overly complicated title can also pose problems. Titles that are burdened with too many keywords, contain complex jargon, or try to describe too much can be difficult to understand and process, especially for users with cognitive disabilities or those who rely on screen readers. Such titles may be cut off by browsers or screen readers, potentially omitting important information.

What the issue is

Content that uses language at a level of complexity not suitable for its intended audience can hinder understanding, particularly for users with cognitive disabilities, learning difficulties, or limited proficiency in the language of the content. It also impact situational accessibility where users are busy or have limited capacity to attend to displayed text.

What the issue is

Web content that uses idiomatic expressions, slang, or jargon without providing explanations can be confusing or inaccessible to users not familiar with that expression. This includes users learning the language or those using assistive technologies, such as translation tools or screen readers, which may not accurately convey the meaning of such expressions.